Tag Archives: social media

Social the Bruce Springsteen Way

Thanks to the generosity of a fabulous friend, I danced Saturday night away at the Bruce Springsteen concert at Gilette Stadium in Foxboro, Mass. A rocking, rambunctious girls night out might not be the most logical place to come up with your top four truths for social media and content marketing. But, truth comes from the strangest places.

4. Be prepared
Bruce Springsteen is famous for taking song requests from the audience. He fully expects his band to be able to play anything from their catalog at a moment’s notice. He changes his set list nightly. Songs played one night make no appearance the next. And, he plays covers on top of his own songs. That’s a tall order.

How does it apply to your social strategy? Are you able to deal with online complaints? Do you know who you are targeting? Do you know who your content creators are? Until you have the answers to these questions, you aren’t prepared to jump into social.

3. Know your fans
Bruce Springsteen has been around for a long time. His first album was released in 1973. Over the past 40 years, he has had commercial hits and flops, and in between. When it comes to planning his concerts, it’s critical that he pay homage to the fans who have granted him his long standing success. What are those favorites? Are they always his commercial hits? With a 40 year catalog to choose from, someone is always bound to be disappointed (I wish he had played Rosalita myself.)

It’s important to know what your fans will forgive, and what will turn them off, possibly forever. (Think Gap and Coca-Cola.) Make sure you are meeting your fans’ needs and wants. After all, they are the backbone of your success.

2. Try something new
Reunion tours are popular. Aging rock stars get together, sing their greatest hits, and collect the profits from a nostalgic, but formulaic tour. They try nothing new. They take no risks. They appeal only to the past, not the future.

But not Bruce. Rather than rest on his impressive rock star resume, Bruce continues to release new music. This tour supports his latest album. Many songs played were from the past few.

It’s critical for your business to keep up with the times. Styles and technology change. Whether that means changing your marketing or changing your logo, newer, potential fans expect you to cater to their reality. Now. If you stay the same while times change, you will be left behind.

1. Give it your all
Even at the age of 62, Bruce Springsteen is a hardworking, hard rocking guy. He put on a 3 and half hour show, never once slowing down. He was a singing, dancing, running, stomping, storytelling, joke making, machine. He played for a good half hour after the lights came on, including an extended version of Twist and Shout. He likely violated some local curfew. He made sure that everyone – from the newest fan to the oldest – had a great time. He played his heart out, making sure his fans – the consumer – felt like they were getting the most for their money.

How do you make your clients feel wanted? Do you make every interaction one they appreciate? Do you balance their needs with those of your business?

Springsteen demonstrated preparation, tradition, experimentation and execution. The very same things that lead to social media success. Bruuuce!

Which of your favorite entertainers pull off this balancing act? We’d love to know!

 

Should Social Ring the Register?

It’s Friday morning. Maybe you are sinking hoops using the Nerf backboard you put up years ago. Maybe you are kicking around your office, thinking about weekend plans, football training camp and… Facebook. Yes, you still aren’t sure about social. On one shoulder is the guy in blue, insisting that you have to do it. On the other is the guy in red yelling that you are busy enough as it is. It’s Friday afternoon, after all. Perfect time for a rousing debate with… yourself.

You aren’t alone. We know first hand that it goes something like this:

Red: I don’t see how Facebook can really help most businesses. For many, it doesn’t lead to sales. Any marketing tool that doesn’t lead to sales shouldn’t be used. It’s a waste of resources.

Blue: Facebook isn’t a marketing tool. It’s an engagement tool.

Red: What does that mean? Facebook takes a lot of time and energy. It diverts staff from real money making ventures to fluff. If it isn’t leading to sales, then why should companies bother?

Blue: It’s important to chat with your customers where they are. Facebook – in spite of press to the contrary – is still growing by leaps and bounds. People are probably already talking about you in social – so you might as well take part in the conversation.

Red: Why? Having that conversation on social is so public. It can go so wrong. Look at what’s happening with Chick-Fil-A.

Blue: True, but it can also go really right. When you use social and Facebook as an extension of your customer service, you can move your customers from paying you to loving you. Building that brand loyalty is super important, particularly in today’s economy. Chick-Fil-A – might be getting hammered on Facebook, but their fans are equally vocal in supporting them.

Red: I’m still not comfortable with recommending action that doesn’t have an easily measurable return on investment. People are so busy and it takes a lot of time and effort to make great content.

Blue: What’s the cost of not doing it? A lot of folks do their research before they commit to a purchase. They want to know a brand. What a brand thinks is important. What their friends think about it. If you don’t have that information out there, you could lose sales.

Red: Maybe. But a lot of people are putting a lot of garbage out on social. They aren’t focusing on what makes them different. They aren’t focusing on what makes their product special.

Blue: True. If you don’t take the time to create great content, you certainly won’t get the engagement and loyalty – and word of mouth promotion – you are looking for.

Red: And why is everyone so focused on Facebook? I see so many brands saying “I have to be on Facebook” without knowing why or what their goals are.

Blue: Absolutely. Not everyone needs to be on all platforms. Does a B-2-B need to be on Facebook? Maybe not. Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Pinterest… they might all be better alternatives depending on the industry, the client base, etc.

Red: So… what were we arguing about? Seems like social is like all other efforts to promote your business. You get out what you put in.

Blue: Yeah. Pass the basketball.

Pintroducing…

Interested in Pinterest?You may have received an invite to Pinterest, the new “virtual pinboard” that allows users to visually share things they like with others. Pinterest is one of the fastest growing social platforms, and boasts a ten percent higher conversion rate than other digital referrer sites.

Pinterest is particularly popular with young women in their early 20s, but plenty of guys are getting in on the act. Pre-defined categories on the site include home and furniture, DIY and Crafts, and Food and Drink. Not for you? Create your own custom boards that focus on your particular interests.

You might be wondering why you need yet another social activity to occupy your time. What started as an individual use, social site, is slowly becoming another form of social media for businesses.

How does Pinterest enhance your other marketing efforts? Pinterest allows you to showcase and share your visual work. The images you “pin” also link back to your source website or blog. This not only helps drive traffic. It also, combined with creative descriptions, helps with search engine optimization.

Like other social platforms, Pinterest allows you to follow and be followed. People following your pinboard receive updates every time you pin new images.

How does this differ from Facebook? The layout is much cleaner and less cluttered. The chatter is far less. In short, Pinterest provides a better visual experience than Facebook. If you want people to focus on look and feel, Pinterest is for you.

Of course, new social media sites mean fun new slang. Much like “friending” on Facebook, these words may start working their way into your daily conversations. Die hard Pinterest users refer to this language as “Terpinology” and some words include:

  • Pinning: The act of adding an image to a pin board
  • Pin Marklet: The bookmark added to the user’s browser which allows them to pin from any site
  • Pinsomnia: Trouble going to sleep due to excessive pinning in the evening
  • Pinteresting: A word describing an image or idea interesting enough to be pinned
  • Pinteruption: A disruption caused by anyone while one is busy on Pinterest
  • Pinja’vu: The feeling you have pinned something before

Technically, Pinterest is still in Beta. If you or your business wants to start pinning, you must request an invite or have a current member send you one. Please drop by Triad’s Pinterest page, and take a look at what we like out there. Let us know what you think!

Happy Pinning!

Blogging Is Dead! Not.

BlogRecently, The Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth released statistics showing a big decline in blogging by Inc. 500 companies. In 2010, fifty percent of the Inc. 500 maintained a corporate blog. By 2011, that number dropped to 37%. The study argues that this decline is due to growth in other social media platforms, such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Great! You wanted to junk your blog anyway. It’s hard to come up with original content, you don’t see clear returns and now you don’t have to do it anymore. Not so fast.

The Inc. 500 is a specific set of privately owned companies, with at least 2 million dollars in revenue last year, and at least $1,000,000 in revenue in 2008. The companies range from 2 employees to thousands, and from industries as diverse and food and beverage to advertising to government services to clothing boutiques.

The only similarity between the companies included in the Inc. 500 is their willingness to apply for inclusion on the list. We can’t assume they all have the same online marketing needs.

You should you keep blogging. Why?

  • Search Engine Optimization: Blogs are useful for SEO for two reasons. First, blogs give you an opportunity to create fresh content, which Google loves. Second, your blog allows you to publish keyword rich content of interest to your customers. Stick those keywords in your post titles, post URLs, and better yet, in your article link text. (Bonus points if these links point readers back to your own website.) Strategic use of blog posts can make your primary website more easily found through search.
  • Establishing Expertise: Why should potential customers choose you? Price? Product? Service? How about because you are the perfect fit for their needs! You are the best at what you do! How do you demonstrate this? Online reviews help. So do social conversations. Blog posts give you one more opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge of your field and your care for the needs and challenges of customers.
  • Social Feeding: You know all those other social platforms you want to post to? What are you posting there? You need content, right? Why not create it yourself! Original content always demonstrates authenticity in social circles. Add blog posts to the mix. It demonstrates that little extra bit of effort that many companies aren’t willing to undertake.

Yes, blogging is hard. But like your broccoli, it’s good for you and your business. Keep it up!

What do you think? Has your company started a blog? What were your experiences like? Let us know!

Fear of Facebook

You sit down at your desk, fire up your computer and check your Facebook page. You notice that someone posted a critical review of your product or company. You are shocked, angry and maybe a little bit scared. What do you do about negative comments on Facebook?

Facebook is arguably the largest social network out there, and certainly one of the most active. There are 845 million monthly active users, who on average spend 20 minutes a day on the site. They upload photos, they like pages, they interact with brands.

But, with Facebook’s power comes risk. When you allow public participation on your Facebook page – or Wall – you also allow negative opinion. Some criticism may be valid, some may be simple disagreements, and some may be folks – sometimes referred to as “trolls” – looking to stir the pot. Regardless of the reason, you need a plan to manage negativity when it happens.

You might think that blocking people from posting on your Wall altogether, or moderating posts before they go live, will help you avoid unwanted comments on your page. But, if you block user comments, you will lose all of the benefit of being on Facebook – namely, your fans promoting your business for you. Facebook is the largest “word of mouth” platform on earth. People trust their friends, not advertising.

If you hold articles for moderation, you can prevent the posting of original negative posts to your timeline. But Facebook doesn’t allow for the moderating of comments. Instead, they go live in real time. (You can create a “spam” list which will block some comments, but this is an imperfect science for another post.)

So, how do you handle negative posts on your Facebook page? By following a few simple rules.

  1. Post a Facebook terms of service on your page. Tell your users your planned content for your page, as well as behavior that won’t be tolerated. Not all comments are appropriate for conversation. You don’t need to subject your business or your fans to abuse. You do need to define which conversations you will engage in. Coca Cola has a great and often copied policy. If you should need to ban someone from posting or delete content, you can point to your public terms of service as justification.
  2. Plan ahead. No one expects to see negative comments on their Facebook wall. But, as with most business operations, proper planning prevents poor performance. Who will respond to negative comments? He or she is your Facebook spokesperson. What authority do they have to craft a message for your brand? How well do they understand your business? These issues need to be ironed out before you publish that brand page.
  3. Respond quickly. Yes, this means checking your Facebook page 2 – 3 times per day. The web is a 24 hour business. You should assign someone to check comments evenings and weekends, as well as during normal business hours. If negative content is found, it should be reported to the designated spokesperson from Step 2.
  4. Respond calmly. Defensive responses will only get the naysayers riled up and more motivated. Just like you, they hope to see viral returns on the content they post to your page. The more you fan the flames, the greater the likelihood it will get out of control. Instead, at all times, just as when responding to any customer complaint, stay polite and professional.
  5. Don’t delete negative posts unless they violate your terms of service. While it may seem uncomfortable to keep negative posts on your Facebook page, remember that doing so demonstrates your commitment to open conversation.
  6. Take the conversation off-line. The last thing you want are accusations flying back and forth on your Facebook page. Remember our designee from Step 2? Post a polite response indicating their contact information and their willingness to engage in a conversation.

Have you had negative comments on your Facebook page? How did you handle it? What troll managing tactics did we miss? We’d love to hear your thoughts!